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COM11
101B, Wisconsin Center

SEO Strategies That Give Your Social Media a Purpose

Presented by Caroline Roberts

Social media channels for universities and colleges are always hard at work. They need to entice prospectives, inform current students, reassure parents, and encourage dialogue for all parties involved. But how can you be sure that your social media content is giving users what they truly need? How do you know that you aren’t just flooding followers with messages that are being ignored?

The best way to send the right message to the right audience is to use the same SEO strategies you should be employing for your main site — exploring the queries that lead to your site and using those terms to inspire content across all of your social media channels. A little keyword research over time can go a long way toward planning a social media calendar that addresses the needs of your users, and well-optimized posts can also include backlinks that drive social media visitors to your main site. By applying SEO tips to social media, you can boost likes, promote your brand, foster dialogue, and increase conversions.

In this presentation, I will share SEO tips that map well to social media, and together we’ll go through examples of how universities and colleges used SEO to improve their social media presence. You will leave with a deeper understanding of keyword research, along with an SEO checklist for Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter content.

About

Caroline Roberts

Content Strategist

Caroline Roberts is a content strategist at iFactory, where she consults with higher ed clients on all aspects of content strategy and search engine optimization, from technical SEO evaluations to seminars on keyword-optimized writing. Roberts has worked with Getty Images on how to optimize their social media content, and she has researched keywords and written content for clients such as the Department of Defense and the National Geographic Channel. She has spoken on content inventories and management at a slew of conferences and has published her content theories in A List Apart.